Half Marathon

Enter The 2019 Event Now

Description

21km of Tauranga goodness, with the bonus of being measured to IAAF standards.
You asked for 21.097km – and we give you exactly that.
The 2019 Half Marathon course has been measured to IAAF standards.

Expect to post smart times on this fast, rolling and scenic on road course.  The course is essentially a double lapper of the popular 10km loop but with a longer first lap 1 of 11.097km. The extra distance in lap 1 comes via an early dog leg onto Beach Road and the boost you’ll get from the crowd as you head through the finish line (the 10.8km mark), and pass through the start line for a second time (11.097km in). Your final 10km is the exact same as the 10km event course.  You’re never far from the Tauranga coastline and your course includes Beach Road, Harbour Drive and Kulim Park.

On your Half Marathon course…
Outside of the awesome scenery on course, entrants will pass our course entertainment, a bunch of supportive event marshals and 6 support stations (Levers Road – 2.2km & 12.5km, Maxwells Road – 4.7km & 15km and Kulim Park – 8.4km & 18.7km).  Each support station is manned by a passionate local community group and will be stacked with R-Line & water, plus will have first aid and toilets available.  Important intersections on your event course have been marked with RED arrows and distance markers will be placed at every km of the event course with RED km markers. Oh and be sure to look out for https://photos4sale.co.nz (our official event photographers) as they operate a PWYW model for event photos too – PWYW sounds familiar right?

Split Start Times.
We take your experience on course seriously.  All walkers (and runners who may complete the course in OVER 150 minutes) start at 6.45am. The remaining 21km entrants (who will complete the course in UNDER 150 minutes) start at 7.30am. The course cut-off for all entrants in the 21km event is 10.45am.

  • 6.45am (for all walkers and for runners who may complete the course in OVER 150 minutes).
  • 7.30am (all runners who will complete the course in UNDER 150 minutes).

Winners Circle.
Recent winners on the Tauranga Half Marathon run course are shown below:
2018. Regan Bones (1:15:43) and Alice Mason (1:16:37)
2017. Craig Kirkwood. (1:12:16) and Jess Ruthe. (1:17:07)
2016. Ben Ruthe. (1:11:23) and Esther Keown (1:20:38)
2015. Ben Ruthe. (1:10:12) and Jess Ruthe (1:17:53)
2014. Kyle McDonald (1:10:06) and Lisa Robertson (1:16:23)
2013. Tony Payne. (1:10:56) and Jess Ruthe (1:17:01)

Pace Runners.
Thanks to Craig Kirkwood Coaching, four key pace runners will be on the start line for the 2019 Pay What You Want Tauranga Half Marathon.  If you are looking to achieve the finish times shown below do stick close by the clearly identified Craig Kirkwood Coaching pace runners on course.
– 1:30:00
– 1:40:00
– 1:50:00
– 2:00:00

Train Crossing Notes.
After approx 4.8km and again at the 15km mark, the event course crosses the railway lines on Maxwells Road. In the unlikely event the bells are sounding as you approach, you’ll simply be marshaled around a turn point on Maxwells Road prior to the railway lines and you’ll be on a detour which then merges back with the main event course less than 1km later. The “train detour” has been measured to IAAF standards too, so irrespective of any detour, each 21km entrant will run the exact same 21km distance on the day.

Let us take care of everything – you just enjoy your day!

Enter The 2019 Event Now
HOW DOES PWYW WORK?

– PWYW pricing for the 21km event is on until April the 4th, 2019. We’d love you to pay the entry fee you’d expect to pay for a professional event like this one, but ultimately you, the participant, decides. If you might not have entered yourself (and the kids?) because it adds up to more than you’d like…well welcome to PWYW baby!

– 10 days out from the event PWYW pricing will take a backseat. From April 5th, 2019 until event day, all 21km entries received will be charged our typical Standard Entry Fees ($65.00). We like to call this our “deterrent” pricing strategy. For PWYW to work, we need to have an accurate prediction of final entry numbers. This way, we hope fewer people will “wait and see”, and more people will enter early so the PWYW dream can live on. *fistbump*.